Hi there.

I'm Radoslav Popov.

I'm a software engineer from Sofia who specializes in creating custom JavaScript apps.

I moved to full-time JavaScript development after being a Java developer in the past, so I often write about the differences between these two colliding worlds - strong vs dynamic types, classes vs objects and functions, etc.

On this site you can also find some thoughts on core JavaScript and the direction front-end engineering is moving in. The community is somehow at a crossroad now. Let's ensure high quality information prevails over all the bullshit regarding JavaScript out there.

How I Started a JavaScript Project in 2016 With Bare Minimum of Tools

The JavaScript environment seems like a scary place these days. People with bare to moderate level of understanding of JavaScript and front-end engineering share articles just to make fun out of it. If you take them seriously, then you will likely give up starting a new application from scratch before even trying. However, it doesn’t have to be so complicated.

This year I had the opportunity to build a custom single-page app from scratch. With my “Stick to basics” approach (similar to the one Addy Osmany shares) I was able to set-up something that boosts productivity, allows for solid quality of the code base, is future-proof and is fun to work on. Let’s review this solution.

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Using NotMyClass.js to Climb the JavaScript Knowledge Staircase

You go to work, follow processes, implement patterns, think about architectures, get the job done, communicate better, become an expert, get respected, get promoted, change job for more money, and use newer and modern technology stack - but are you smarter with the way you write your code?

I was recently interviewed for a position for a JavaScript developer in a very interesting company. At the end of our second meeting, when we discussed the frameworks and libraries the company uses, they mentioned my.class.js. "Not even a library", the boss said, "more or less a single file helping us organize our code".

This was a showstopper for me. I've always liked JavaScript, and I think I am also going to like it in the future. One thing that makes JavaScript so fascinating, however, is that different people have different visions about the way it is best to write it. I have my own, my.class.js has another one, and certainly both don't go along together. Explaining the reasons behind my decisions and the roots of my different vision, however, was not an easy task.

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